The Effects of Environment on your Roof

The effects of environment on your roof are responsible for how it changes in appearance as the years go by. Just as your skin ages, so does your roof. One thing that ages both your skin and your roof is the sun.

The sun can cause the temperature on the roof to be 50-75 degrees higher than the temperature of the surrounding air. The heat alone can cause some roofing materials to blister and crack. It’s the main source of roof leaks.

In addition to the heat, the sun is a source of UV radiation. UV radiation has been shown to degrade the asphalt layers that make up your shingles. A protective layer of colored granules is used to reduce this effect. Liquid EPDM Rubber coatings are the best option to coat your roof shingles. Without that kind of roof coating the shingles would degrade very quickly. The use of the granules has added years to the lifespan of modern roofs.

Sudden changes in the roof temperature also speed the shingle aging process and roof starts leaking. Thunderstorms are common occurrences on hot days in many parts of the world. The temperature on the roof rises gradually as it is heated by the sun. When the rain starts to fall on the roof, the temperature can drop as much as 60 degrees almost instantly.

The wooden decking beneath the shingles expands with the heat and then contracts suddenly with the quick cooling. This places a strain on the shingles. As with other effects of environment on your roof, the aging process is relatively slow. But you have these sudden changes in temperature many times during a year. This is one of the reasons that shingles have a limited lifespan.

Moisture from rain and snow also has a negative effect on your shingles unrelated to the temperature change. Moisture causes wooden roof decking to expand. From the perspective of the shingles, the deck is moving. The movement loosens the shingles.

The effects of environment are worsened because of pollution and acid rain. Pollution hits the roof along with raindrops. Smoke from car exhausts, factories and other sources lands on the roof. The pollution causes the color of the shingles to darken, sometimes only in spots that are noticeable from the driveway.

Acid rain degrades the asphalt in shingles. The acid eats away at all parts of your roof gradually.

None of these changes occur suddenly. It may seem sudden if you get up on a ladder to clean the gutters and suddenly notice curling, blisters, cracks or stains. There is only so much you can do to minimize the effects of environment on your roof. Some aging is inevitable.

Summer is the best time to fix your roof leaks problems. You can get rid from such roofing problems by selecting the best roofing products like liquid epdm, liquid rubber and liquid roof coatings for your roof. Liquid Rubber is the only Liquid EPDM product in the world. Liquid roof coatings are also the best option for your RV Roof Repair problems.

For product information or ordering visit EPDM Coatings or call them at 855-281-0940.

A Brief History of Roofing Materials

A complete history of roofing materials would start in the Stone Age. Popular modern material has not been around quite that long but even clay roof tiles have been in use for thousands of years.

Of course the manufacturing processes have changed and improved. People are no longer limited by the location of the material. That was a major factor to consider before present-day shipping methods were introduced.

Clay tiles are popular in some areas and for some architectural designs. The tiles are more expensive than other options but they are long-lasting. Shingles are a far more popular choice.

The history of modern shingles is not nearly as long as that of clay. Wood shingles or shakers were used until insurance companies started refusing to insure homes and businesses with roofs covered by them.

The first composite roof material was used in the 1840s. They are referred to as composites because they are composed of two or more substances, rather than a single material. Modern shingles are composites but the first composite roofs bore little resemblance to the ones we use today. Also there are lots of roofing materials like Liquid EPDM Coatings, liquid roof and liquid rubber coatings are available in the market for fixing roof leaks.

The substances used in the earliest composites were felt or woven fabric, pine tar and sand. Improvements were made by saturating the fabric with asphalt and substances such as sand, crushed limestone or talc. Coal tar came next in the history of roofing materials.

Coal tar is a byproduct of coal manufacturing processes. It was not until the introduction of gas lighting for city sidewalks that enough of the byproduct was generated to find an application in the roof industry.

The coal tar was mixed with fine gravel and rolls of felt were saturated with it. The rolled material was then attached to roofs. Asphalt shingles soon replaced the rolled material.

Henry M. Reynolds made a significant contribution to the history of roofing materials. He came up with the concept of shaping the earlier asphalt-coated roof fabrics into individual shingles in 1903. Reynolds was a roofer and manufacturer. The first shingles he produced were hand cut with a sharp knife.

In 1914, F.C. Overby began adding crushed granules of slate to add weight to the shingles and keep them from blowing off the roof. Roller-die cutting machines were perfected the following year making the mass-production of shingles more practical. Most of the changes that have occurred since that time have been decorative, except for the use of fiber glass to reinforce the felt fabric, which occurred in the 1970s.

That is a very brief history of roofing materials that are very helpful for repairing roof leaks. Liquid EPDM Rubber and Liquid Roof coatings are the best roofing products that will give you cost effective solution for your roofing problems. Although there are other choices, composite shingles are still the most popular for homes.

For product information or ordering visit EPDM Coatings or call them at 855-281-0940855-281-0940.

Things to Remember When Applying Liquid EPDM

1)      Catalyst must be added prior to use.  Scrape sides of container with a rubber spatula to ensure catalyst distribution.

2)      Xylene or Mineral Spirits Solvents may be added to adjust viscosity or for clean-up.

3)      Easiest way to spread the rubber on a flat surface is to broadcast material with a rubber squeegee then roll using a short nap roller.  Product is self leveling.  A flat spatula can be used for small areas.

4)      Product has a long pot life after catalyst has been added; 4-6 hrs. depending on temperature.

5)      Only temperature affects the rate of cure.  Relative humidity has no influence. 

6)      Product is hydrophobic (sheds water) so substrate to be coated must be dry initially.  The uncured rubber can get wet or even have ponding water, with only a cosmetic effect after application, and will still cure.

7)      The rubber will penetrate into porous substrates such as wood and poured concrete.  A primer/sealer should precede application of rubber.

8)      The chemical reaction of the catalyzed rubber can be arrested by freezing the material.  This can keep material usable for weeks or months.  To use again simply allow it to reach room temperature and apply.

Liquid EPDM Coatings are aftermarket roof sealants

A number of aftermarket roof sealants are available, including urethanes, acrylics and liquid rubber. Liquid EPDM rubber is by far the most durable of the sealants available and has the widest range of applications.

It is more water resistant than other rubbers, including neoprene. It is more resistant to swelling and has a wider range of acceptable temperatures. It can be applied directly to practically any roofing material other than asphalt and can even be used on wood that has been primed.

Liquids have an obvious advantage over sheets. Sheets have seams. Seam sealers eventually deteriorate and water gets through the seams and under the sheeting.

Liquid EPDM can be used on top of neoprene, although some pre-treatment of the surface is required. Just knowing that the liquid rubber is recommended for use on top of the other type of rubber should be an indication that the material is more durable.

Liquid EPDM can also be used on top of polyurethane after a light sanding. It is somewhat surprising that urethanes are still used as aftermarket roof sealants. It is known that the structure is damaged by UV light and that discoloration occurs relatively quickly. Anyone who has made the mistake of using urethane as a roof sealant should consider applying liquid EPDM to truly protect the roof.

The liquids can also be used to seal existing leaks. They are self-adhering and fill up tiny fractures that let water through. It is a good idea to use a thick coat and cover the entire surface instead of attempting to only cover the leaky area.

When covering the entire roof, the liquid rubber reduces heat buildup. Not only does the roof stay cooler, but the interior of the building or the vehicle will also stay cooler. This benefit may reduce heating costs and keep the occupants more comfortable.

Liquid EPDM has become the most popular choice for RV roofs, because of all the above-mentioned advantages. It extends the lifespan of the roof and requires less maintenance. It lasts up to three times longer than any other aftermarket RV camper rubber roof sealant and also reduces noise from rain.

As far as price goes, most sealants are similar in price. Depending on where you buy, EPDM may be a little more expensive, but because primers and additional coats are not usually necessary, and because it lasts so much longer, owners who choose this aftermarket roof sealant save money in the long run.

Types of elastomeric coatings and uses

The Many Types of Elastomeric Coatings and Uses of Them

The types of elastomeric coatings and uses of them are numerous. Here you can learn a little bit about each type and the purposes for which they are most often used.

Elastomeric Coatings

Elastomeric Coatings

Modified Asphalt

A modified asphalt coating consists of asphalt and rubber-like polymers. This material is most often used on roofs, although there are a few other applications. It is not suitable for sealing driveways or for covering other asphalts, as it does not adhere directly to asphalt.

There are several disadvantages of this material. It is only available in black, which absorbs and transfers heat, making the building hotter if it is used on the roof. Softening and deterioration occurs over time due to exposure to solvents, grease and UV light.

Polyurethane

There are several categories of polyurethane coatings. They are used to cover spray-foam, wooden decking and other building materials. None are exactly waterproof, although they do help to prolong the life of wood by preventing rot.

Aromatic polyurethanes are one type. The disadvantages include discoloration and chalking over time. They are often used as a base coat for other polyurethanes, although when used as a final coat, the appearance is initially pleasing. Modified and single component polyurethanes are also available.

Silicone

Silicone types of elastomeric coatings and uses are limited. They are recommended in situations where “breathability” is desired. Moisture vapor can pass through the coating.

Silicone is not compatible with other materials. For example, an EPDM coating will not adhere to silicone. Since the coating allows the passage of water vapor, it is not recommended for roofing or similar applications.

Neoprene

Neoprene is a type of synthetic rubber made by DuPont. The coating is fast drying and retards vapors, but a top coat is required when the coating is used on exterior surfaces. Thus, there are numerous limitations to types of elastomeric coatings and uses of them.

Hypalons

Hypalons are another type of synthetic rubber also made by DuPont. The Hypalons have more applications than the Neoprene material. They can be used as fire retardant and waterproofing agents. They are often used in roofing and for coating tanks and coolers.

The Hypalons are compatible with other coatings and can be used on top of many of them, but it is necessary to check with the manufacturer about that.

Butyl Rubber Types of Elastomeric roof Coatings and Uses

Butyl rubber is the most water resistant coating, which makes it a good choice for applications that are very wet or very cold. The coating is often used in coolers, freezers and cryogenic storage units, water storage units, ponds, pools and roofs.

There are limitations of this type of coating. It can be damaged by hail, foot traffic or flying debris. It has a tendency to become chalky and is more sensitive to weather than some of the other options.

EPDM

EPDM is yet another type of synthetic rubber. It has the widest range of applications and the highest compatibility with other materials. Only asphalt and silicone cause problems with adhesion. The coating can be used on those surfaces if an undercoating is used.

Flame retardant materials can be added to EPDM if fireproofing is desired. The UL listing on the manufacturer’s label will reveal the fire resistance of the coating.

EPDM is often used in roofing as a waterproofing agent. It is long lasting when exposed to weather and can serve as a top-coat with no additional treatment. EPDM is among the best types of elastomeric coatings and uses of EPDM are nearly unlimited.