BUTYL LIQUID RUBBER – EPDM COATING CORP

BUTYL LIQUID RUBBER – EPDM COATING CORP
Don’t re-roof. Re-coat and save thousands of dollars

Properly applied roof coating systems can breathe new life into a mature low slope roofing system, brightening its appearance, enhancing its energy efficiency and delaying for years the day when it will have to be recovered or replaced. The operative phrase in that sentence is “properly applied.” Coating a roof is more than simply spraying, rolling or brushing on the finish coats. What will determine the quality and longevity of the installation is the time and attention paid to preparing the roof before it is coated. Too often, contractors take shortcuts on, or skip altogether, this essential first step. The result? Problems with the existing roofing system remain problematic, the coating system does not properly adhere to the substrate, and a roof restoration that could have lasted 10 or 20 years fails in as little as two or three. Completing three simple steps before applying the coating system will prevent this outcome and help ensure the newly coated roof delivers the expected years of hassle-free, watertight performance. First, repair any existing damage. Second, perform the roof surface.

WHY PREPARATION IS ESSENTIAL

It is understandable that contractors new to coating application and untrained in the process could overlook the preparation step. Their experience is in working with roll-good roofing, where preparation is a step that can be overlooked because the existing roof will be recovered or replaced with new TPO, EPDM, PVC or modified bitumen. The new system will cover up any leaks or other damage and will be designed to address ponding water or other issues that plagued the existing roof. When coating, however, the contractor is not installing a new roof, but is restoring or maintaining the performance of the existing roofing system. Roof coatings are not “miracles in a bucket.” They will not fix leaks, reseal open seams, repair deteriorated flashings or loose terminations, prevent ponding water, address damaged or saturated insulation or substrates, or correct other problems with the underlying roofing system. Those issues will still exist after the coating has been applied and may prevent the coating from properly adhering to the roof. And if a coating is slapped on top of a grimy, greasy, debris-ridden roof, it almost certainly will soon begin to flake, blister or peel off.

REPAIR EXISTING ROOF DAMAGE

Step one is to assess the existing roofing system and make necessary repairs, carefully following the relevant guidelines from the manufacturer of the original roofing system and the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA). In general, the existing roof assembly must be structurally sound, watertight and free of shrinkage, buckling, unacceptable ponding conditions, encapsulated moisture, open seams, open or damaged flashings, loose terminations and other serious defects. Coatings also should not be applied if the substrate or insulation is saturated with water. The good news is that, with some simple repairs, even a roofing system with significant damage can be made a viable candidate for coating. The following examples illustrate some Common scenarios. Problem: A roof has an area that is susceptible to ponding water. Solution: Fill the ponding area with slope-correcting materials or correct the slope with a cricket or tapered insulation and cover it with new materials similar to those of the existing roof. It may be necessary to install drains to allow positive drainage. Problem: A 2-square area of a 100-square TPO membrane is damaged. Solution: Cut out the problem area and replace it with like material, or heat weld two squares of new TPO over the existing membrane to recover the damaged area. Problem: There is an active leak in one corner of a roofing system. Solution: Cut into the damaged area. Remove and replace the saturated insulation if necessary. Fold the membrane back in place and flash around where the cut was made. structurally sound, apply primer to encapsulate the existing rust and inhibit the creation of additional rust. If any panels are so corroded that they are no longer structurally sound, replace them; the remaining panels can be left in place. Problem: The seam welds on a TPO or PVC roofing system are pulled or loose. Solution: Several options are available. (1) Reheat the seams to weld them back in place. (2) Put a target patch made of new membrane over the seams. (3) Reseal the seams with flashing compound.

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PERFORM AN ADHESION TEST

A coating’s performance depends on how well it adheres to the substrate. An adhesion test should, therefore, be performed to ensure that the coating is compatible with the substrate and that encapsulated moisture or other underlying issues that could impact adhesion have been properly addressed. Instructions from the coating manufacturer should be followed, and those instructions may vary based on the warranty desired but following are general guidelines. Choose a 2-foot-by-2-foot area of the roof as the test site. Clean the area using a rag or bristle brush and a solvent that will flash off quickly without leaving a soapy residue behind, such as acetone, xylene or mineral spirits. Coat a 1-foot-by-1-foot section of the test area, replicating what the finished system will be. If the roof will be primed, prime the test area. Apply primer and finish coats at the same application rate that will be used to coat the entire roof. Embed several strips of Tietex or other polyester-reinforced fabric, each roughly 1 inch wide and 12 inches long, into the coating, leaving Problem: A metal roof has rusted. a 4-inch-long pull tab outside of the wet area. Brush the fabric to embed it into the coating. Apply a second coat of finish coat to ensure the fabric is fully saturated. Allow the coating to cure fully, at least 4 to 5 days. Test the adhesion using a fish scale. For each test strip, tie a knot in the loose, uncoated end of the fabric strip Hook the fish scale into the knot. Using the fishhook, pull the fabric straight up. The ideal “pull strength” is at least 4 pounds per linear inch (pli) of fabric, or at least 4 pli over a sound and dry substrate. The test is a “pass” if the fabric separates from the coating, leaving the coating still adhered to the roof membrane. The test is a ““failure”” if the coating separates completely from the roof surface. All adhesion tests should be documented with photos of the cleaned substrate, the wet coating and embedded fabric, and the face or display of the fish scale showing the resistance observed in the test.

CLEAN THOROUGHLY

Roof surfaces must be thoroughly cleaned prior to coating. Over years of constant exposure to the elements, dirt, oils, bird droppings and other debris collect on a roof’s surface. If not removed prior to coating, they interfere with the coating’s ability to adhere to the substrate. Rather than sticking to the roof, the coating fuses to the grime and, unsurprisingly, may soon begin to peel off. The best results will be achieved by applying the manufacturer’s recommended roof wash or cleaner and then power washing. While power washing alone will get the roof clean, the roof wash loosens the dirt, grease and other debris, allowing it to be removed with less-aggressive power washing. We highly suggest using roof protect.  This cleaner actually emulsifies the contaminates on the roof and also has a built in mildewcide.  This gentler approach significantly reduces the risk of damaging the roofing membrane while cleaning. Years of being subjected to sun, rain, snow, ice, heat and cold can weaken the membrane, and a blast with a heavy-duty gas-powered rig generating 2,800– 4,000 psi of pressure can easily blow a hole in it. A smaller rig generating only 1,800–2,500 psi of pressure will remove the sediment in most cases. Using a walk-behind power washer, rather than a common extension wand-type setup, also helps ensure adequate cleaning pressure at the surface of the substrate without over-exerting effort on the behalf of the worker. Rinse water should be directed toward drains and scuppers to ensure the detergent and debris are completely removed. If the rinse water is simply allowed to evaporate, what can be left behind instead of a clean, coating-ready surface is a caked-on mixture of gunk and detergent residue. EPDM roofs should be power washed twice — once with ROOF PROTECT and once with clean water. The carbon black that gives EPDM its black color breaks down over time, and that dust must be removed to ensure proper adhesion of the coating. The test of whether the carbon dust has been completely removed is a quick wipe of hand across the surface; a clean hand means a clean roof. Granulated modified bitumen roofs should be swept with a dry broom or power broom prior to power washing to remove loose granules that could clog the roof drains. Make any necessary repairs.  Perform an adhesion test. Thoroughly clean the roof surface. Completing these three simple steps before coating will help ensure a successful roof restoration that extends the roofing system’s life, adding years of weathertight, hassle-free performance

How to Prepare for Roof Repair with a Roof Coating

Naturally, you want to make sure that you have a reliable roof and that it will not need to have frequent repairs. This means that you want to have a great Butyl Liquid Rubber coating installed the first time, as this can protect and prolong the life of the roof. However, even though this has the potential to last for decades, there could still be a need for repairs from time to time.

This might occur when you notice that fallen debris has blown onto the roof and may have caused damage, such as a puncture. If these punctures are left untreated, it could eventually provide a way for water to get through the coating and to the roof. Everyone knows that water can be the death knell for a roof.

Therefore, you want to be sure that you are keeping your roof safe and in good shape. Check the roof occasionally for signs of pooling water and leaks that could have developed because of external damage to the coating. If there is any sign of damage, it’s time to make a repair.

You Probably Don’t Need a New Roof

In some cases, the damage to your roof might be severe and the only solution is to have a brand new roof installed. However, that’s not always the case. Sometimes, the damage or problems are relatively minor. If you have a Butyl coating on the roof, then it will likely only need to have a minor repair. They can be repaired easily, such as with a roof coating that can cover areas where there is damage that could create leaks. The rubber roof repair is a fast and easy solution that can help you to save a substantial amount of money.

Of course, it will depend on the extent of the damage and the type of roof you have. Often, rubber coatings will work better for roofs that are flat or that have only a small, gentle slope.

When making roof repairs, it is important to make sure that you examine the entire roof to locate all of the potential areas that will require patches on the Butyl coating that was already applied. Most of the time, you will find that you don’t need to make any repairs as long as the coating was properly installed in the first place.

Butyl Liquid Rubber

Make Sure the Roof is Properly Prepared

If you are going to be adding a patch of Butyl Liquid Rubber to your roof, make sure that you follow all of the basic directions to using the product. You want to have a clean area where you will be adding the patch, of course. You also want to be sure that you apply the patch on a day where it will dry properly. Typically, it will only take a couple of hours before the product is waterproof, which gives you a lot of leeway as to when you can use it.

Should you handle the roof repair on your own? One of the benefits of using rubber coatings for roofing and repair is that it can be a DIY project. Of course, it will depend on the extent of the repair, as well as your DIY knowledge and desire, as to whether you want to handle it on your own or not.

Never ignore damage to the roof, even if it might seem like a small issue. It will only get worse over time. Check the roof to learn the extent of the problem and then determine the best way to complete the roof repair.

DIY RV Maintenance and Repair Projects: Liquid Roof Repair

If you’re like most RV owners, you appreciate the ability to handle your own maintenance and repair needs. After all, labor costs a fortune when you hire someone to do the work. The materials for most RV projects, including liquid roof repair, are fairly inexpensive and available at most home improvement stores and online RV supply stores. Therefore, if you are a somewhat handy person, you can save a lot of money on maintenance and repairs by doing the work yourself.

Liquid roof repair might sound intimidating, but it is actually one of the easiest types of roofing to work with on an RV. Keep reading to learn more about repairing your liquid RV roof.

Inspect the Roof Condition

Don’t even bother shopping for repair supplies and materials until you can get up on your RV roof and take a look at the damage for yourself. Use your smartphone camera to notate hard-to-find areas of damage or wear that need redone while you are inspecting the roof. Also, look at the amount of area that needs repaired. Usually, this roofing material holds up better than others, but it can still get damaged or be prone to wear over the years. Depending on the amount of damage or wear, and how old the RV roof is, it might be a better idea to do a full recoat than to just repair the affected areas.

Check the Owner’s Manual

If the roofing on your RV is the same material that was installed at the time of manufacture, there is probably important warranty information in the owner’s manual. This information will advise on proper cleaning and repair methods and products that can be employed without voiding the warranty.

If your roof has been replaced since the RV was first built, you should have the warranty information for that replacement somewhere. Even if you put on the liquid roof yourself, the product that you used has some kind of manufacturer’s warranty. Again, you’ll want to look into this to make sure that whatever you do doesn’t void any warranties or guarantees.

How to Choose Liquid Roof Repair Materials

Now that you are familiar with how to complete repairs or recoat your RV roof without voiding any warranties, you can pick up the products that you need and get to work. Choose liquid roof coatings and repair kits that work with your existing roofing material. You can find repair and patch kits or purchase the liquid roofing and accessories or tools you need separately, making it easy for you to get the right supplies for the job. As long as you have the correct type of materials, the rest of your purchasing decision will be based on things like:

  • Price
  • Brand Reputation
  • Application
  • Durability and Longevity

Recoating is More Common than Repairing

When dealing with a liquid roof, repairs are generally minimal because the material is designed to be durable, flexible, and hold up to all kinds of extremes and elements. This cost-effective roofing option generally needs a recoat before it needs repair, simply due to wearing down with age. Resealing or recoating a liquid roof is a routine part of ownership, and you can expect your roof to need a fresh coat every 3-5 years, depending on frequency of use, climate, and how your RV is stored.

If you do find yourself in the position of needing repairs on your liquid roof, the process should be a simple one. Just remember to start with a clean slate and remove all of the debris and damage so that your repair creates a strong, watertight seal. When done right, repairs should last a long time, or at the very least, until your next recoating job.

Easy Ways to Avoid Costly Forms of RV Roof Repair

No one wants to spend the time and energy on getting their RV’s roof repaired. But you’d never know it, judging by how some people treat their vehicles. If you don’t take the necessary steps along the way, RV roof repair will become inevitable. Continue reading to learn some simple things you can do to make sure that your RV doesn’t end up needing constant repairs to its roof.

Safety First
Before you ever do anything involving your RV’s roof, be sure you check the owner’s manual. You’ll want to be well informed about how much weight it can carry. Even if you’re well below the maximum amount that it mentions in the manual, it’s best not to spend any more time on top of your RV than you absolutely need to. The fact that you can see damage has been done means that there could be more elsewhere. Take the wrong step, and all of a sudden you could need professional help for your RV roof repair.

Inspect It Regularly
If you aren’t constantly looking, it can be easy to forget how much abuse your RV’s roof takes. From tree sap to rain to debris and much more, your RV is constantly being exposed to issues that could easily result in its roof needing repairs.

So the first step in avoiding RV roof repair costs is inspecting the roof every 3 to 4 months. If it stays parked under trees for prolonged periods of time, you’ll want to do this more often. Otherwise, you risk issues like algae and mold building up. Be sure that the seams get a close inspection every 6 months, as well.

This means checking the inside, too. Just because you don’t notice any issues from the outside, that doesn’t mean your RV isn’t in trouble. Water stains on the ceiling or towards the top of the walls are reliable signs that something has gone wrong.

Clean Regularly
Inspecting your RV’s roof is important, but so is keeping it nice and clean on a regular basis. Oftentimes, you can’t see the beginning of a problem forming, but cleaning your RV’s roof is a big step in stopping that issue in its tracks. Always be sure that you’re using products that have been specifically made for RVs.

Handle the Issue on Your Own
Sometimes, no matter what you do, problems arise. Fortunately, if it’s a leak, many will fall under the kinds of RV roof repairs that an amateur can handle on their own. You can save a lot of money this way, too. So, if you notice a leak, be sure to address it as soon as possible. Just like with cleaning supplies, though, you’ll want to make sure that you only use products that were made for an RV. For example, if you have a leak, you’ll want to use a sealant. Plenty are made for actual shingle-and-tar roofs, but that will only make matters worse in this scenario.

Fortunately, if your RV springs a leak, there’s plenty you can do to handle the matter on your own. Most people would like to avoid any RV roof repair with Liquid Roof as much as possible. As such, follow the above advice, and your roof will be less likely to need your help.

How to Maintain and Repair Your Metal Roof

With proper maintenance and timely repairs, metal roofs can last a very long time. These systems are designed to be long-lasting. Here are some maintenance and repair suggestions that will keep your roof looking like new, year after year.

Inspect and Clean Regularly:

Inspect your roof at regular intervals throughout the year. Seasonal inspections are a good idea to save your roofs from leaks if you live in an area where there are four distinct seasons. You should also inspect after storms. Hail, wind, snow and even severe rain can damage your roofing.

You should clean your roof at least once a year. You may only need to clean once a year to make sure that gutters are clear of leaves and other debris that could cause water to pool or ice dams to form. You can use soap and water to clean most metal roofing systems, but check the manufacturer’s specifications to be sure.

Ensure that Different Metals Do Not Touch:

If different kinds of metal touch and become wet, they will corrode. For example, copper pipes projecting through sheet metal will eventually rust at the point of contact. There are products on the market to prevent this kind of contact.

Repair Scratches:

Minor scratches might not seem like a big problem. But if they are not repaired, water will gather in the uneven surface and rusting will occur. To repair scratches, pour a small amount of mineral spirits on a clean cloth and use it to remove any debris from the scratches. After the area dries, take a small paintbrush and cover the scratched area with an appropriate color of metal touch-up paint. You can follow up with a clear coat to provide additional protection. Summer season is the best time to fix roof leaks problems and there are products available in the market like Liquid EPDM Rubber coatings and Elastomeric coatings.

Remove Rust:

Rusty spots should be sanded down first using a scrubbing cleanser and then light sandpaper. Do not use a wire brush. Once the rusted area is smooth, apply a metal primer. After the primer dries, use your touch up paint to improve the appearance and follow up with a clear coat if desired.

Repair Dents:

Dents may be popped out if you have access to the underside of the roof. Otherwise, you may need to call a professional. Repairing dents in metal roofing calls for the use of a stud welder. It’s not a job for the average do-it-yourselfer.

Consider a Protective Elastomeric Coating:

Elastomeric coatings can further increase the lifespan of the roofing system. Today’s Elastomeric roof coatings are available in an assortment of colors. They provide waterproofing, help to reduce sounds and can add to the beauty of your roof. You may not have to do all of these things, but the more time you spend protecting your roof form roof leaks, the longer it will last.

For product information or ordering Visit their site at https://www.epdmcoatings.com or their facebook page http://www.facebook.com/liquidepdm or call them at 855-281-0940.