How Long Will a Butyl Rubber Roof Coating Last?

Butyl rubber roof coating products are becoming quite popular today. They offer several different benefits, but one of the biggest is their longevity and durability. Compared to standard roofing materials, rubber offers an impressive lifespan of well over 20 years in many applications. That is combined with the fact that this coating is lightweight, making it among the best choices for people who want something durable without weighing a ton.

For example, tile roofing can last upwards of 50 years, but tile is heavy and costs a lot of money. Butyl rubber is much more affordable and could last just as long, with less maintenance, fewer up-front costs, and a more durable finish that you don’t have to worry about as much as delicate tile.

Today, many roofing materials have increased lifespans that still rival some of the best rubber roof coatings. However, there is a lot more to rubber roofing than just how long it lasts. For starters, during that lifetime, rubber will require less maintenance and care than other materials. Simple inspections and cleanings will be all that are needed to ensure the roof is in good shape for as long as possible.

Studies have shown that with regular sealing and maintenance, butyl roofing can last up to 60 years or more. This means that you can spend less on a new roof and have to replace it less often. Plus, butyl is a synthetic rubber, so it’s not depleting environmental resources or impacting the environment. Even the production methods are relatively eco-friendly these days.

If it is not properly applied or maintained, you may not get this same kind of life expectancy out of your butyl rubber roof coating. It can also fail early if there is a severe weather incident or another situation that causes severe impact damage to the roof. However, for the most part, this material is durable and can stand up to a lot more than people think.

If you aren’t sure about how to apply this roofing, take the time to ask the experts or hire a professional to do the job. Installation needs to be done properly in order to get the best life out of your roof, whether you choose a butyl rubber roof coating or any other material out there today. Fortunately, rubber is easier to work with and it’s ready to solve your roofing needs.

EPDM Rubber Roofing Applications, Pros and Cons, and More

EPDM rubber roofing is a popular product on the market right now. It is available in several forms and offers a more durable roofing application than several other materials. It offers the benefit of being affordable and flexible, while still providing premium protection. It’s also designed to reflect UV rays and provide a more balanced temperature for the environment.

What is EPDM roofing and are there any disadvantages to consider? That depends on exactly what you’re looking for in new roofing material. EPDM is an eco-friendly choice because it’s a synthetic rubber that doesn’t require sourcing the world’s ever-declining population of rubber trees. The harvesting process for rubber isn’t so eco-friendly, but synthetic rubber creation does well.

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Not only that, but many EPDM roof coatings are recycled, or at least totally recyclable. That means when you remove or replace the roof, you can send the old roof back to be recycled into some kind of new synthetic rubber. EPDM coatings are fire-resistant and water-resistant, which means they will provide premium protection from all kinds of elements and issues. When properly installed and maintained, you can expect these roofs to last for 20+ years.

They also lower energy costs by helping keep interior spaces more temperate. The liquid rubber roofing is generally affordable, but sheeted EPDM or other systems may require more installation and therefore have higher installation costs. Do your homework to make sure that you know your options and choose the right EPDM rubber roofing for your needs, whether that’s liquid or sheeting, or anything else.

EPDM isn’t exactly the most aesthetically appealing roofing material. However, it’s durable and flexible and it provides years of use for those who need a better solution for their roof. The best thing that you can do is to talk to the professionals to discuss what EPDM rubber roofing can do for your needs and whether it’s the best choice.

If it ends up being the best option, you’ll be happy to know that it’s eco-friendlyand affordable, and it will help you avoid future roofing issues for years to come. Explore the market of EPDM rubber roof products and find the ones that you like best or ask the pros to help you decide. In either case, you’ll quickly see why so many people are choosing this route for their roofing applications when they need something more durable than traditional materials.

Pros and Cons of Liquid Butyl Rubber Roofing

Liquid rubber roof coatings are popular for several applications. They’re durable and generally easy to work with, and they come in several styles so that there’s something for just about every need. When it comes to choosing the right materials, it can be helpful to take the time to get to know all the options a little better. To help with that, here are some things to consider when thinking about using liquid butyl rubber roofing.

Usually, a liquid butyl rubber roof is fairly simple to install. Some people can do it in an afternoon or a weekend on their own, while others might enlist the help of professionals. Liquid roofing is great because it’s easy to work with and goes on much like paint. Instead of having to lay sheets and protective membranes and then seal all the seams, liquid offers a much simpler application.

Liquid roofing is also durable and flexible, which means it can hold up to a lot more than the average roofing material. Plus, it’s lightweight, so it doesn’t add a lot of pressure to the ceiling or roof structure like some materials would. It helps prevent moisture from seeping into the roof and can even help with ponding water resistance so that no water gets in, even if there’s a puddle on the roof for a week.

And of course, you can’t forget how butyl coatings reflect as many as 80-90% of the UV rays from the sun, so they are more eco-friendly and help keep heat from building up in and on the roof.

There aren’t as many disadvantages to consider with this type of product, but there are a couple of things to keep in mind. Liquid butyl rubber roofing is harder to spray on, but that’s where professionals come in handy. If you choose a spray-on roofing product, be sure to mind cleaning the equipment well. The only other real disadvantage is that there’s a lack of color stability but usually people installing these roofs aren’t looking for a custom color or finish.

All in all, liquid butyl rubber roofing is a great product with many benefits and useful applications. Make sure that you explore all the options that you have for roofing to get the best finish, no matter what type of rubber roofing that is. You’ll have a durable roof that will last for up to 20 years or more, and that’s just the start.

BUTYL LIQUID RUBBER – EPDM COATING CORP

BUTYL LIQUID RUBBER – EPDM COATING CORP
Don’t re-roof. Re-coat and save thousands of dollars

Properly applied roof coating systems can breathe new life into a mature low slope roofing system, brightening its appearance, enhancing its energy efficiency and delaying for years the day when it will have to be recovered or replaced. The operative phrase in that sentence is “properly applied.” Coating a roof is more than simply spraying, rolling or brushing on the finish coats. What will determine the quality and longevity of the installation is the time and attention paid to preparing the roof before it is coated. Too often, contractors take shortcuts on, or skip altogether, this essential first step. The result? Problems with the existing roofing system remain problematic, the coating system does not properly adhere to the substrate, and a roof restoration that could have lasted 10 or 20 years fails in as little as two or three. Completing three simple steps before applying the coating system will prevent this outcome and help ensure the newly coated roof delivers the expected years of hassle-free, watertight performance. First, repair any existing damage. Second, perform the roof surface.

WHY PREPARATION IS ESSENTIAL

It is understandable that contractors new to coating application and untrained in the process could overlook the preparation step. Their experience is in working with roll-good roofing, where preparation is a step that can be overlooked because the existing roof will be recovered or replaced with new TPO, EPDM, PVC or modified bitumen. The new system will cover up any leaks or other damage and will be designed to address ponding water or other issues that plagued the existing roof. When coating, however, the contractor is not installing a new roof, but is restoring or maintaining the performance of the existing roofing system. Roof coatings are not “miracles in a bucket.” They will not fix leaks, reseal open seams, repair deteriorated flashings or loose terminations, prevent ponding water, address damaged or saturated insulation or substrates, or correct other problems with the underlying roofing system. Those issues will still exist after the coating has been applied and may prevent the coating from properly adhering to the roof. And if a coating is slapped on top of a grimy, greasy, debris-ridden roof, it almost certainly will soon begin to flake, blister or peel off.

REPAIR EXISTING ROOF DAMAGE

Step one is to assess the existing roofing system and make necessary repairs, carefully following the relevant guidelines from the manufacturer of the original roofing system and the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA). In general, the existing roof assembly must be structurally sound, watertight and free of shrinkage, buckling, unacceptable ponding conditions, encapsulated moisture, open seams, open or damaged flashings, loose terminations and other serious defects. Coatings also should not be applied if the substrate or insulation is saturated with water. The good news is that, with some simple repairs, even a roofing system with significant damage can be made a viable candidate for coating. The following examples illustrate some Common scenarios. Problem: A roof has an area that is susceptible to ponding water. Solution: Fill the ponding area with slope-correcting materials or correct the slope with a cricket or tapered insulation and cover it with new materials similar to those of the existing roof. It may be necessary to install drains to allow positive drainage. Problem: A 2-square area of a 100-square TPO membrane is damaged. Solution: Cut out the problem area and replace it with like material, or heat weld two squares of new TPO over the existing membrane to recover the damaged area. Problem: There is an active leak in one corner of a roofing system. Solution: Cut into the damaged area. Remove and replace the saturated insulation if necessary. Fold the membrane back in place and flash around where the cut was made. structurally sound, apply primer to encapsulate the existing rust and inhibit the creation of additional rust. If any panels are so corroded that they are no longer structurally sound, replace them; the remaining panels can be left in place. Problem: The seam welds on a TPO or PVC roofing system are pulled or loose. Solution: Several options are available. (1) Reheat the seams to weld them back in place. (2) Put a target patch made of new membrane over the seams. (3) Reseal the seams with flashing compound.

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PERFORM AN ADHESION TEST

A coating’s performance depends on how well it adheres to the substrate. An adhesion test should, therefore, be performed to ensure that the coating is compatible with the substrate and that encapsulated moisture or other underlying issues that could impact adhesion have been properly addressed. Instructions from the coating manufacturer should be followed, and those instructions may vary based on the warranty desired but following are general guidelines. Choose a 2-foot-by-2-foot area of the roof as the test site. Clean the area using a rag or bristle brush and a solvent that will flash off quickly without leaving a soapy residue behind, such as acetone, xylene or mineral spirits. Coat a 1-foot-by-1-foot section of the test area, replicating what the finished system will be. If the roof will be primed, prime the test area. Apply primer and finish coats at the same application rate that will be used to coat the entire roof. Embed several strips of Tietex or other polyester-reinforced fabric, each roughly 1 inch wide and 12 inches long, into the coating, leaving Problem: A metal roof has rusted. a 4-inch-long pull tab outside of the wet area. Brush the fabric to embed it into the coating. Apply a second coat of finish coat to ensure the fabric is fully saturated. Allow the coating to cure fully, at least 4 to 5 days. Test the adhesion using a fish scale. For each test strip, tie a knot in the loose, uncoated end of the fabric strip Hook the fish scale into the knot. Using the fishhook, pull the fabric straight up. The ideal “pull strength” is at least 4 pounds per linear inch (pli) of fabric, or at least 4 pli over a sound and dry substrate. The test is a “pass” if the fabric separates from the coating, leaving the coating still adhered to the roof membrane. The test is a ““failure”” if the coating separates completely from the roof surface. All adhesion tests should be documented with photos of the cleaned substrate, the wet coating and embedded fabric, and the face or display of the fish scale showing the resistance observed in the test.

CLEAN THOROUGHLY

Roof surfaces must be thoroughly cleaned prior to coating. Over years of constant exposure to the elements, dirt, oils, bird droppings and other debris collect on a roof’s surface. If not removed prior to coating, they interfere with the coating’s ability to adhere to the substrate. Rather than sticking to the roof, the coating fuses to the grime and, unsurprisingly, may soon begin to peel off. The best results will be achieved by applying the manufacturer’s recommended roof wash or cleaner and then power washing. While power washing alone will get the roof clean, the roof wash loosens the dirt, grease and other debris, allowing it to be removed with less-aggressive power washing. We highly suggest using roof protect.  This cleaner actually emulsifies the contaminates on the roof and also has a built in mildewcide.  This gentler approach significantly reduces the risk of damaging the roofing membrane while cleaning. Years of being subjected to sun, rain, snow, ice, heat and cold can weaken the membrane, and a blast with a heavy-duty gas-powered rig generating 2,800– 4,000 psi of pressure can easily blow a hole in it. A smaller rig generating only 1,800–2,500 psi of pressure will remove the sediment in most cases. Using a walk-behind power washer, rather than a common extension wand-type setup, also helps ensure adequate cleaning pressure at the surface of the substrate without over-exerting effort on the behalf of the worker. Rinse water should be directed toward drains and scuppers to ensure the detergent and debris are completely removed. If the rinse water is simply allowed to evaporate, what can be left behind instead of a clean, coating-ready surface is a caked-on mixture of gunk and detergent residue. EPDM roofs should be power washed twice — once with ROOF PROTECT and once with clean water. The carbon black that gives EPDM its black color breaks down over time, and that dust must be removed to ensure proper adhesion of the coating. The test of whether the carbon dust has been completely removed is a quick wipe of hand across the surface; a clean hand means a clean roof. Granulated modified bitumen roofs should be swept with a dry broom or power broom prior to power washing to remove loose granules that could clog the roof drains. Make any necessary repairs.  Perform an adhesion test. Thoroughly clean the roof surface. Completing these three simple steps before coating will help ensure a successful roof restoration that extends the roofing system’s life, adding years of weathertight, hassle-free performance

What is a Liquid Butyl Rubber Roofing System?

There are several roofing options out there today, including a variety of materials and even roofing “systems” or designs that include a full application process from start to finish rather than just a material and installation (as with shingles, for example).

There are several roofing options out there today, including a variety of materials and even roofing “systems” or designs that include a full application process from start to finish rather than just a material and installation (as with shingles, for example).

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Butyl is a synthetic copolymer, which basically means it’s a blend of different rubbers that create a structurally sound product that is uniquely able to be applied as a liquid. It then cures to harden but remains flexible, which makes it an ideal roofing system for several different applications.

In the past, only rolled or sheeted rubber roofing was available. Not only were these materials more expensive, but they were heavier and they required more installation. They also left seams that needed to be sealed to prevent leaks. With liquid butyl rubber, that’s no longer an issue. This material can reach places that sheeting could never have even thought about covering and they can be applied on all kinds of roofs, including:

  • Fiberglass
  • BUR
  • Modified bitumen
  • Concrete
  • Metal
  • And more

This roofing material is gaining popularity for all of its conveniences and its ease of use. There are several products on the market today and it will be up to you to choose the ones that best suit your needs.

This roofing material is gaining popularity for all of its conveniences and its ease of use. There are several products on the market today and it will be up to you to choose the ones that best suit your needs.

This roofing material is gaining popularity for all of its conveniences and its ease of use. There are several products on the market today and it will be up to you to choose the ones that best suit your needs.

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These durable roofing systems are functional and durable, and they’re not that difficult to install. Plus, they’re liquid, so they can be applied with ease when compared to traditional roofing systems. Although a Liquid butyl rubber roofing system isn’t the only option on the market, it’s certainly worth a look for those who want something affordable, efficient, and durable.